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Inhalant Intervention

Intervention for inhalants is much like other substance abuse intervention strategies.  The difference with inhalants is that the drug is easily obtained and because of such, is often used by young people who don’t realize the danger.  From the perceived benign use of whipping cream canisters, to the obvious of inhaling automotive exhaust.  They effects of inhalants are inseparable from nerve and organ damage, however, most at risk are children engaged in simple tasks such as mowing the lawn or building crafts that require the use of mineral spirits, lacquers, solvents and/or glue.  Basically when a person inhales the toxic substance, it causes oxygen deprivation.  The deprivation then allows the users attention and presence in the moment to escape any form of reality.

Abuse of inhalants specifically means that the user is intentionally self-inflicting damage to him or herself in an attempt to feel the euphoria that come with chemical usage. 

The greatest obstacle in intervention is having the chemically dependent person in denial.  Simple acts of denial, lying about using inhalants or refusing to discuss it, are clues that the user himself/herself deep down inside knows that a problem exists.  If they didn’t think it was a problem, then they wouldn’t be lying or trying to hide it. 

There are many types of intervention, they range from an individual or co-worker confronting the person using to hiring a professional interventioninst.  The most effective form of intervention is family intervention.  This involves members of the family who have a certain amount of trust and influence over the affected person.  The family intervention strategy is about loved ones communicating concern for the person using and letting them know at the same time they are setting limits with what they will accept.  It is important with intervention that the family or person intervening has resources or professionals available to assist the user in treatment options.

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